Stone Farm Rocks

Southern Sandstone

Another stunning south east venue, usually considerably quieter than the nearby Harrison’s. As with all southern sandstone, leader placed protection cannot be used because of the soft nature of the rock and whilst this might be a little unusual for us trad obsessed Brits, you will quickly get into the top-roping zone and come to appreciate the fine climbing on offer. This is a great place to while away a lazy afternoon, ticking classics and basking in the sun as it dips over the treetops.

Crag information
Climbing Area: London & South East Rock Type: Sandstone
Importance: Regional CRoW Land: Yes
Ownership: Private No. of Routes: 80
Within National Park: No Year Developed: 1943
Grid Reference: TQ381348

The BMC has owned the crag since 2001 and now manages the site for climbers and conservation with input from a group of keen local volunteers on the Harrisons Rocks Management Group (HRMG).

The rocks are situated 2¼ miles south-south-west of East Grinstead, and just to the south of a public bridleway that leads west from Stone Hill House. The crag is designated under the name of Stone Hill Rocks as a geological SSSI due to the unusual bedding formations. It is an important site for the study and interpretation of sedimentary structures in the upper Lower Tunbridge Wells Sand. Bolt belays have been placed at the top of the crag in an attempt to minimize any further erosion.

There are no bolts above Stone Farm Crack and Pine Buttress, and instead the rotten tree stump has to be used for a belay - caution is advised.

There is usually a bees nest in the trees at the top of Remote. The bees seem to be fairly tolerant of climbers nearby but it is worth being careful whilst climbing in this area when they are present and active.

Parking and Approach

There is space of a few carefully parked cars at a layby on Admiral's Bridge Lane. If this is full, more parking is available down at the reservoir with a short walk along the footpath across fields to access the crag from below.

CRoW Information

Open access land, designated under the Countryside & Rights of Way Act (2000) give area access rather than linear access as provided by public rights of way. It also gives a legal right of access specifically for climbing, as well as walking and other quiet recreation on foot.

Please bear in mind however that the landowner still has the right to restrict access for up to 28 days per year (often used on public safety grounds for shooting in moorland areas), and can also apply for longer term restrictions with Natural England (such as bans on dogs, or regular restrictions during particular times of year). It is important to check for these restrictions regularly as they can be added at short notice – all details for open access land in England can be found on Natural England’s website.  

Area information

Follow this link for the definitive Code of Practice for climbing on southern sandstone; https://www.thebmc.co.uk/bmcNews/media/u_content/File/access_conservation/southern_sandstone/ssc05_print.pdf

Weather Information

Guidebook info currently being updated

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